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Crack SSH Tunnel Easy 1 2 3 2




SSH Tunnel Easy 1 2 3


SSH Tunnel Easy 1 2 3




SSH tunneling is a technique that allows you to create a secure connection between your local computer and a remote server, and use it to access network resources that are otherwise inaccessible or restricted. SSH tunneling can be used for various purposes, such as:


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  • Accessing a database, web server, or other service on an internal network from outside.



  • Bypassing firewalls, proxies, or censorship that block certain ports or websites.



  • Encrypting your web browsing traffic and preventing third parties from snooping on your online activity.




In this article, we will show you how to set up SSH tunneling in three easy steps, using the ssh command on Linux, macOS, and other UNIX-like systems, or PuTTY on Windows. We will also explain the different types of SSH tunneling and how they work.


Step 1: Connect to an SSH Server




The first step is to connect to an SSH server that you have access to. This can be a server that you own, rent, or borrow from someone else. The SSH server must be reachable from your local computer and allow SSH connections from outside. You will also need a username and password (or a key pair) to log in to the SSH server.


To connect to an SSH server using the ssh command, open a terminal and type:


ssh [USER@]SSH_SERVER


Replace [USER@] with your username on the SSH server, and SSH_SERVER with the IP address or hostname of the SSH server. For example:


ssh alice@192.168.0.10


If your SSH server is listening on a port other than 22 (the default), use the -p [PORT_NUMBER] option. For example:


ssh -p 2222 alice@192.168.0.10


You will be prompted to enter your password (or passphrase if you are using a key pair). Once you enter it, you will be logged in to the SSH server and see a shell prompt.


To connect to an SSH server using PuTTY on Windows, download and run PuTTY from [here]. In the PuTTY Configuration window, enter the IP address or hostname of the SSH server in the Host Name field, and the port number in the Port field (if different from 22). Then click Open. You will be asked to enter your username and password (or passphrase) to log in to the SSH server.


Step 2: Set up SSH Tunneling




The second step is to set up SSH tunneling between your local computer and the SSH server. There are three types of SSH tunneling: local port forwarding, remote port forwarding, and dynamic port forwarding. Each type has a different syntax and use case.


Local Port Forwarding




Local port forwarding allows you to forward a port on your local computer to a port on the remote SSH server, which is then forwarded to a port on another machine. This way, you can access a service on another machine as if it was running on your local computer.


For example, let's say you want to access a web server running on port 80 on machine web001.host, which is only accessible from the SSH server. To do so, you can forward port 8080 on your local computer to port 80 on web001.host via the SSH server. Then you can open your web browser and type in the address bar to see the web page.


To set up local port forwarding using the ssh command, use the -L option with the following syntax:


ssh -L [LOCAL_IP:]LOCAL_PORT:DESTINATION:DESTINATION_PORT [USER@]SSH_SERVER


The options are as follows:



  • [LOCAL_IP:]LOCAL_PORT - The IP address and port number on your local computer that you want to forward. If LOCAL_IP is omitted, the ssh command binds on localhost (127.0.0.1).



  • DESTINATION:DESTINATION_PORT - The IP address or hostname and port number of the destination machine that you want to access. The destination machine must be reachable from the SSH server.



  • [USER@]SSH_SERVER - The username and IP address or hostname of the SSH server.




For example, to forward port 8080 on your local computer to port 80 on web001.host via the SSH server, use the following command:


ssh -L 8080:web001.host:80 alice@192.168.0.10


To set up local port forwarding using PuTTY on Windows, in the PuTTY Configuration window, go to Connection > SSH > Tunnels. In the Source port field, enter the port number on your local computer that you want to forward. In the Destination field, enter the IP address or hostname and port number of the destination machine, separated by a colon. Select the Local option and click Add. Then go back to Session and click Open to connect to the SSH server.


Remote Port Forwarding




Remote port forwarding allows you to forward a port on the remote SSH server to a port on your local computer, which is then forwarded to a port on another machine. This way, you can access a service on your local computer from another machine via the SSH server.


For example, let's say you want to share a file on your local computer with someone else who can access the SSH server. To do so, you can run a simple HTTP server on port 8000 on your local computer, and forward port 8000 on the SSH server to port 8000 on your local computer. Then you can give the other person the URL to download the file.


To set up remote port forwarding using the ssh command, use the -R option with the following syntax:


ssh -R [REMOTE_IP:]REMOTE_PORT:DESTINATION:DESTINATION_PORT [USER@]SSH_SERVER


The options are as follows:



  • [REMOTE_IP:]REMOTE_PORT - The IP address and port number on the remote SSH server that you want to forward. If REMOTE_IP is omitted, the ssh command binds on localhost (127.0.0.1) of the SSH server.



  • DESTINATION:DESTINATION_PORT - The IP address or hostname and port number of the destination machine that you want to access. The destination machine must be reachable from your local computer.



  • [USER@]SSH_SERVER - The username and IP address or hostname of the SSH server.




For example, to forward port 8000 on the SSH server to port 8000 on your local computer, use the following command:


ssh -R 8000:localhost:8000 alice@192.168.0.10


To set up remote port forwarding using PuTTY on Windows, in the PuTTY Configuration window, go to Connection > SSH > Tunnels. In the Source port field, enter the port number on the remote SSH server that you want to forward. In the Destination field, enter the IP address or hostname and port number of the destination machine, separated by a colon. Select the Remote option and click Add. Then go back to Session and click Open to connect to the SSH server.


Dynamic Port Forwarding




Dynamic port forwarding allows you to create a SOCKS proxy server on your local computer that can forward traffic to any destination via the SSH server. This way, you can use any application that supports SOCKS proxy (such as web browsers) to access any network resource through the SSH tunnel.


For example, let's say you want to browse the web securely and anonymously using your web browser. To do so, you can create a SOCKS proxy server on port 1080 on your local computer, and configure your web browser to use it. Then all your web traffic will be encrypted and routed through the SSH server.


To set up dynamic port forwarding using the ssh command, use the -D option with the following syntax:


ssh -D [LOCAL_IP:]LOCAL_PORT [USER@]SSH_SERVER


The options are as follows:



  • [LOCAL_IP:]LOCAL_PORT - The IP address and port number on your local computer that you want to use as a SOCKS proxy server If LOCAL_IP is omitted, the ssh command binds on localhost (127.0.0.1).



  • [USER@]SSH_SERVER - The username and IP address or hostname of the SSH server.




For example, to create a SOCKS proxy server on port 1080 on your local computer, use the following command:


ssh -D 1080 alice@192.168.0.10


To set up dynamic port forwarding using PuTTY on Windows, in the PuTTY Configuration window, go to Connection > SSH > Tunnels. In the Source port field, enter the port number on your local computer that you want to use as a SOCKS proxy server. Select the Dynamic option and click Add. Then go back to Session and click Open to connect to the SSH server.


Step 3: Test SSH Tunneling




The third step is to test SSH tunneling and verify that it works as expected. Depending on the type of SSH tunneling you set up, you can use different methods to test it.


Test Local Port Forwarding




To test local port forwarding, you can use any application that can connect to a specific port on your local computer, such as a web browser, a telnet client, or a curl command. For example, if you forwarded port 8080 on your local computer to port 80 on web001.host via the SSH server, you can open your web browser and type in the address bar to see the web page from web001.host.


Test Remote Port Forwarding




To test remote port forwarding, you can use any application that can connect to a specific port on the remote SSH server, such as a web browser, a telnet client, or a curl command. For example, if you forwarded port 8000 on the SSH server to port 8000 on your local computer, you can open another terminal and type:


curl


This will show you the output of the HTTP ser


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